Off The Court with Angie Felton


 

 

Feb. 7, 2012

If you want to know about Louisiana Tech senior Angie Felton, you better ask one of her teammates.

The 5-foot-9-inch guard isn't one to reveal the scouting report on herself.

Quiet. Reserved. Discreet. All adjectives that describe the sharp-shooter who signed with the Lady Techsters out of Gulf Coast Community College two years ago.

"I'm a private person," Angie said, very quietly.

Her teammates would agree with the assessment, although they do see another side of Angie.

"She is a quiet person, but once she gets to know you, she will open up," said teammate and roommate Tavasha Anderson. "She's funny; kind of a quiet funny. You wouldn't expect her to say some of the stuff she says. She's kind of subtle. She's just crazy like the rest of us."

Thankfully, Tavasha doesn't mind talking about her roomie.

"She tries to play like she can't cook, but she can," Tavasha said. "She just likes helping me prep and then she will clean the dishes. She can cook, she just doesn't like to.

"And she loves bread. Every time I cook she asks me what kind of bread we are having. If it's not croissants, she wants rolls, if it's not rolls, she wants biscuits. She loves bread. She eats a lot. She's small but she eats a lot."

End of the scouting report from the kitchen.

When asked to tell something about herself that most people don't know, Angie just sat and smiled and didn't say a word - (insert crickets chirping here).

"I love Twizzlers," she eventually revealed. "I just like chewing on them." Louisiana Tech head coach Teresa Weatherspoon doesn't care if Angie is quiet ... as long as she lets her play on the court do the talking.

This year the Leesburg, Florida native has done just that, averaging 7.1 points per game (through 15 contests) while shooting 44 percent from the field, 75 percent from the free throw line and an even more impressive 49 percent from the three-point line.

 

 

Angie ranks among the Western Athletic Conference's top three-point threats, having connected on 18-of-37 shots from beyond the arc.

All of these numbers are improvements from her first year playing in a Lady Techster uniform. Last year was a season where Angie lost some confidence, averaging only 2.7 points per game and shooting only 36 percent from the field and 33 percent from the three-point line.

Angie said it was a tough transition from the junior college ranks to Division I basketball.

"Getting used to the system and doing everything at a fast pace (was the toughest adjustment)," she said. "I just kept telling myself to keep going hard every day, and that it would all pay off."

And it has. Angie has gotten off to a much better start this year, scoring a career-high 16 points in the second game of the season against Oral Roberts. Maybe her most impressive performance came in Tech's last game when she led the Lady Techsters with 15 points in a loss to LSU.

She credits a lot of her development to playing for Weatherspoon.

"It's been great (playing for Coach Spoon)," Angie said. "She is going to bring out the best in you no matter what."

When she isn't in the gym or the classroom, Angie said she enjoys listening to R&B music - Mary J Blythe and Monica are her two favorites - and she also spends a lot of time on Facebook and Twitter.

"I'm a big Facebook person," she said. "I like that you can speak your mind. I like posting my status and seeing what other people are doing. I'm trying to learn Twitter."

Angie, who said she started playing the drums in church when she was young, signed with LA Tech after leading Gulf Coast CC to the 2010 National Junior College Athletic Association national title. She scored 20 points in the 83-61 win over Jefferson College in the national title game.

She chose LA Tech over UCF, Florida Gulf Coast and a number of other mid-majors - "Louisiana Tech was my biggest offer out of junior college."

Angie, whose mother Theresa is a police officer in Eustis, Florida and whose father Kenneth works at a high school in Wildwood, Florida, said that she would like to play basketball overseas after college.

If that doesn't work out, Angie said she wants to work with children; maybe as a counselor.

She can let the children do the talking ... and she can just listen.